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Mary Mastroeni
mmastroeni@remax.net
Mary Mastroeni
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Gardening for Your Small Deck or Patio

July 11, 2017 12:39 am

Having limited outdoor space is no reason to curb your love of gardening or to settle for less than a thriving green space. From tasty fruits and veggies to flowering plants, trees and shrubs, container gardening is a great way to enhance your small deck or patio, say gardening editors at Home and Garden TV.

Test your green thumb with these:

Dwarf citrus trees – If your space provides a little sunlight, dwarf lemon or lime trees will typically do well when planted in terracotta pots.

Strawberries – Try planting them in a hanging basket that gets lots of sunlight and get a season’s worth of sweet, ripe berries.

Red, ripe tomatoes – Yes, you can grow smaller varieties in pots. Start with young plants or establish see plantings indoors first, then transfer them in pots to a sunny spot on your deck or patio.

Potted roses – If the area gets at least five hours of daily sun, planter pots of dwarf or mini-sized roses will produce colorful blooms all summer long. Prune them out of season as you would prune their larger cousins.

Mini herb garden – Group varying sizes of containers together and get ready to season your best dishes with mint, chives, and other herbs grown in a limited space.

Sunflowers – There is nothing as cheerful as these summer favorites. Choose colorful pots – or let the kids paint tin cans with enamel pain, then plant dwarf sunflower seeds in each.

Low-care succulents – Because they store water in their fleshy leaves and stems, these evergreen plants do well even when you don’t water regularly. They need a little sun, though, so group pots of succulents in a light, bright corner.

Flowering vines – Compact climbers, like jasmine and clematis, are great container plants. All they need to thrive is a pot with good drainage, a trellis or post for support, and regular watering and feeding.

Bonus tip: For an engaging change from store-bought pots, plant your favorites in colorful vintage tins scooped up at thrift stores or garage sales.  

Published with permission from RISMedia.

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